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RideLondon becomes plastic water bottle free

SJRoberts
Thames Water Employee

What do bicycles and bottles have in common?

In hot weather, is there anything less appealing than a tube or bus journey? There’s no air-con and sometimes it’s like travelling in a furnace. But there are other ways to get about.

 

Cycling is one of the best ways to get around London – as well as being a literal breath of fresh air, it’s better for you.

 

Cycling has been shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, and just thirty minutes of cycling burns around 200 calories. Studies have also demonstrated that it has a positive impact on mental health. Perhaps most importantly, it’s better for our planet, because it doesn’t produce any air or noise pollution.

 

That’s why it goes hand in hand with drinking London’s world-class tap water. Did you know that manufacturing one litre of bottled water produces 500 times more CO2 than producing the same amount of tap water?

 

Pedal against plastic waste.

Plus, a lot of plastic bottles don’t get recycled. At the moment, about 40% of bottles get thrown away, which can end up polluting our rivers and oceans. When you consider that average Londoner buys 175 bottles of water every year, that’s over 1.4 billion bottles in total!

 

If you find cycling in the city a little daunting, why not pop along to RideLondon next weekend, and see just how fun it can be? Over 100,000 cyclists are taking to the streets of London, of all ages and abilities. And we’re this year’s official drinking water provider.

 

We hope to eliminate the need for bottled water completely. Last year, 65,000 plastic bottles were given out during the weekend. Manufacturing those bottles produces the same amount of CO2 emissions as charging 6 million iPhones!

 

Once RideLondon is over, you can still get access to our world-class. We’re installing 100 public drinking fountains in London, so you can tap in on route. And hundreds of thousands of cafes, restaurants and other public spaces have signed up to the Refill scheme, to offer free tap water.